I know it is too late for many here but,it might save one colon.
I am driven to solve the disease.
Hopefully I will get it close someday.

Old Mike-AKA Glenns Dad

Here is the whole thread from another forum,what I have posted here are mostly studies.

http://www.healingwell.com/com....aspx?f=38&m=2834542

Based on Dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel diseases: the oxygen hypothesis.
The key point I believe is that facultative anaerobes should not be present in any kind of high amounts.
Seems like this is tying together.

Inflammation, generates more oxygen in the colon iNOS/possible excess nitrates in diet/ROS/blood, all add to excess oxygen , or oxygen radicals. Obligate anaerobes/bacteriodes die, trpsin/protease is not deactivated,facultative anaerobes grow and invade,more inflammation,tissue destruction. Not necessarily in this exact order.

Interestingly enough bacteriodes are the only bacteria known to deactivate trypsin, a serine protease.

If too much protease is present say in the colon/rectum we start to digest ourselves.



Possible trigger events.

Antibiotics

excess nitrate in diet

infection

pesticides



Believe need a multipronged approach.

Low nitrate/nitrite diet. May need to go totally organic,and stop certain veggies.

Possible low arginine diet/reduced arginine.

Manganese

Perhaps DMSO or other oxygen scavenger that works in the colon.

Might even need pred to first stop the inflammation, as much as possible.

Certain probiotics may help,don't know which ones.

Probably much more one can do,need to put more thought into it.



This might be why they can't find a specific IBD pathogen,and why it is idiopathic.

Its our own bacteria.



Please read all this info so you can understand what is going on.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23677008


inflammation probably causing the problem

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23478337

levels in ibd

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7481547



host derived nitrate.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23393266



well what do you know,brings us full circle back to inos.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/re.../02/130207172102.htm



inhibitors

HtWUa6ZCuQJ:www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/17/7/8118/pdf+&cd=7&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us" target="_blank">http://webcache.googleusercont...&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us



arginase

http://www.healingwell.com/com....aspx?f=38&m=2607313

more

http://www.jimmunol.org/content/173/3/2109.full.pdf

You would want to be Manganese sufficient.



more bacteria are NO generators

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com...36.2008.03612.x/full

diversion colitis

http://link.springer.com/artic...1018885217154#page-1

counter point

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com...2/ibd.3780050115/pdf



NO from dysbiotic respiration of nitrate

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com...036.2008.03612.x/pdf



Nitrates in diet

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/90/1/1.full.pdf

http://www.nutritionj.com/content/8/1/16

http://www.inchem.org/document.../jecmono/v50je07.htm



Moving on to nitrates and nitrite my old thread,more info.

http://www.healingwell.com/com....aspx?f=38&m=2503059



Oxygen scavengers

DMSO

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8493453

and UC dmso

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1350610

free radicals old stuff,takes some time to load

http://gut.bmj.com/content/34/7/865.full.pdf




trypsin and bacteria

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23840402

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21073731

I am always harping on protease.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trypsin



Something might be going on with certain probiotics

http://www.sciencedirect.com/s...ii/S0891584906004229



some NO chemistry

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1782592/



inos mucus

not sure what this might mean, brand new info

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23977158



another on dysbiosis

http://archive.ispub.com/journ...sthash.uC9lL8Q3.dpbs



selenium

http://link.springer.com/conte....1007/BF02034441.pdf

http://www.degruyter.com/view/....067/bc.2003.067.xml

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3277928/



Se with milk thistle and vitamin E .For reference



Larry Smarr video on gut bugs

http://lsmarr.calit2.net/multimedia?vid=2EMzInPwDDQ



AHR real important stuff-thread

http://www.healingwell.com/com...6&g=2818976#m2818976



have to look at this one carefully

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23093385



mucosa associated ecoli counts and

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23989750



NO and diet

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9171946

http://www.pnas.org/content/107/41/17716.abstract

tryptophan not sure what is going on here have to read

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23794341



interesting no article,believe his anti-inflammatory diet is full of crap but rest is ok

http://thyroidbook.com/blog/ni...-autoimmune-disease/



to lower NO might need to do the following,perhaps impossible diet

low nitrate/nitrate=organic veggies might be enough not sure,low spinach/celery

low citrulline=no watermelon at least it may also be in other veggies

low arginine and orthinine=low protein

Such a diet might be dangerous, really have to look into what can be eaten.



veggie diet interesting,just a normal veggie diet

http://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/171451



NO and Sulfide

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com...36.2008.03612.x/full



more nitrate

http://hes.wfu.edu/assets/mill...0RESEARCH%202012.pdf



arginine NO mild colitis experiment

http://informahealthcare.com/d...3152?journalCode=gas

more

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pm...6/pdf/v049p00387.pdf



crohns gut bug types

http://www.obgynnews.com/news/...3ca53b49a3d3867.html

Follow up info.
http://archive.ispub.com/journ...9lL8Q3.TglVgq8e.dpbs

More new info on dysbiosis in UC. Seems to be a strict anaerobe.

Looks like they are killed off,NO at it again I suspect.

Interesting they say ONSET.

"Bacteria play an important role in the onset and perpetuation of intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). "



Resistant starch has got to help.

This is perhaps why lacto bacteria helps some people,cross feeding =metabolites from one set of bacteria

feeding others like Faecalibacterium prausnitzii

Seems like we need to eat for our gut ecology,and not just what we like,also might want to cut down on fat.

Might also suggest some citrus fruit with each meal,whole fruit with pulp,or at least juice with pulp.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24021287

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12361264



most abundant in normals and missing in us Faecalibacterium prausnitzii

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23831042



trying to figure out where they come from

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23351032

lots of bad actors also

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clostridium

guessing soils

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC123838/

read

http://jmm.sgmjournals.org/content/59/2/141.full



whole grains can increase also bitter melon and yams,not sure how good whole grains are for UC people

http://www.motherjones.com/env...a-weight-loss?page=3



not sure what this says but it might seem we need to eat fiber fiber fiber/RS/RS/RS resistant starch

of course this = gas gas gas but this is a way to increase Faecalibacterium prausnitzii

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20346190



http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21952691



slow process

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10673915
Post Edited (Old Mike) : 9/12/2013 12:12:57 PM (GMT-6)



Perhaps a clue as to why vegetarians might get UC.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22182464

uc

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22092917



real good article on what happened to our food

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01...?pagewanted=all&_r=0
Original Post
I'm replying to this old post because its the only one on the forum I can find that mentions Resistant Starch. Although you suggest that the information may save a colon, it may have just saved a pouch.

I have been taking resistant starch for the past 3 weeks and the results are pretty remarkable. I've not had calprotectin results back yet but it is obvious the benefits this one small dietary change has made. Coupled with psyllium powder my output has never been as good. Digestion is clearly improved and I am experiencing no pouch discomfort with 4-6 BMs per day. There is a lot of evidence in the literature supporting RS. My own understanding is that RS is a probiotic and carries the bacterial overgrowth out of the bowel whilst causing a decrease in Ph and a by product is butyrate which nourishes the new colonosites that make up some of the pouch mucosa. I am currently on no medication with this protocol.

In addition, I had by fecal microbiome sequenced by uBiome which showed a clear dysbiois. My GI was unsure how to respond to the results as this is at the cutting edge of their area. He suggested maybe trying antibiotics but given the recurring nature of pouchitis my own approach is ecology over warfare.

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