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I hope not. I have been a weight lifter my entire life before i got sick. I am convinced it helped me heal faster after my surgery. I go in for my second stage in August and my takedown will be in Nov. After i heal i fully plan on hitting the weights again. Im sure i will have to be careful and not lift as heavy but exercise is very important.

@Jaydog posted:

I hope not. I have been a weight lifter my entire life before i got sick. I am convinced it helped me heal faster after my surgery. I go in for my second stage in August and my takedown will be in Nov. After i heal i fully plan on hitting the weights again. Im sure i will have to be careful and not lift as heavy but exercise is very important.

I would not recommend that, that is risky for us

Since my pouch in 86, I've done tens of thousands of abdominal reps as part of my 3x weekly work-out.  As the movements are controlled and not 'explosive', I believe they have significantly helped my overall physiology. 

Keeping my core strong has undeniably helped my back (L4/5 discectomy), and in my completely unfounded opinion, has created a strong and stable 'girdle for my guts & pouch.

Crunches, the ab wheel, lots of planks, hanging leg raises done with correct form and in a proper progression, I think, are 'safe' ... but everyone needs to evaluate the various inputs ... be honest about their own capabilities and decide for themselves with their own surgeon's guidance.

What works for @Jaydog may or may not be good for others ... but if it works for him/her, I respect that ... but again, we should each decide individually.

@Jaydog - good luck with your second step & takedown!

@Michael posted:

Since my pouch in 86, I've done tens of thousands of abdominal reps as part of my 3x weekly work-out.  As the movements are controlled and not 'explosive', I believe they have significantly helped my overall physiology. 

Keeping my core strong has undeniably helped my back (L4/5 discectomy), and in my completely unfounded opinion, has created a strong and stable 'girdle for my guts & pouch.

Crunches, the ab wheel, lots of planks, hanging leg raises done with correct form and in a proper progression, I think, are 'safe' ... but everyone needs to evaluate the various inputs ... be honest about their own capabilities and decide for themselves with their own surgeon's guidance.

What works for @Jaydog may or may not be good for others ... but if it works for him/her, I respect that ... but again, we should each decide individually.

@Jaydog - good luck with your second step & takedown!

Well if I could make you not do that, I would. The only thing I can do is share ino, the choice is yours if you want to chance that. Some people get away with stuff for a long time, but it does not mean forever. I respect your choice though. Be careful. Give what I said some thought.

I think the key is no sudden/jerky movement and to ease into a routine.  Ease, as in very slowly increase intensity.  After surgery, I initially started back to exercising regimes where I had left off prior to surgery and suffered multiple hernias.  Many months after the hernia surgery, I began with very simple, easy routines and slowly increased the intensity and duration (very slowly).    (started with 1 set of 10 sit ups with knees bent, lifting head a few inches from the ground;  standing leg lifts bring each foot off the ground 12 inches.  Minimal emphasis on cardio or resistance) 

These routine exercises have helped me avoid additional hernias and have completely done away with sciatica problems I had developed during the time I was not exercising. 

I did clear this with my surgeon and GI doctor prior to beginning exercises.  (well, I did after the hernia surgery)

Last edited by ezpete
@ezpete posted:

I think the key is no sudden/jerky movement and to ease into a routine.  Ease, as in very slowly increase intensity.  After surgery, I initially started back to exercising regimes where I had left off prior to surgery and suffered multiple hernias.  Many months after the hernia surgery, I began with very simple, easy routines and slowly increased the intensity and duration (very slowly).    (started with 1 set of 10 sit ups with knees bent, lifting head a few inches from the ground;  standing leg lifts bring each foot off the ground 12 inches.  Minimal emphasis on cardio or resistance) 

These routine exercises have helped me avoid additional hernias and have completely done away with sciatica problems I had developed during the time I was not exercising. 

I did clear this with my surgeon and GI doctor prior to beginning exercises.  (well, I did after the hernia surgery)

You still have to be careful! I had GI doctors say it was okay to purse a 6 pack but others say its not. Do not do anything too extensive or over do anything. Dr. Shen is very knowledgable about these things and he agrees. We should not lift anything over 20-25 pounds. 

@ezpete posted:

I think the key is no sudden/jerky movement and to ease into a routine.  Ease, as in very slowly increase intensity.  After surgery, I initially started back to exercising regimes where I had left off prior to surgery and suffered multiple hernias.  Many months after the hernia surgery, I began with very simple, easy routines and slowly increased the intensity and duration (very slowly).    (started with 1 set of 10 sit ups with knees bent, lifting head a few inches from the ground;  standing leg lifts bring each foot off the ground 12 inches.  Minimal emphasis on cardio or resistance) 

These routine exercises have helped me avoid additional hernias and have completely done away with sciatica problems I had developed during the time I was not exercising. 

I did clear this with my surgeon and GI doctor prior to beginning exercises.  (well, I did after the hernia surgery)

You did it the smart way How old is your J-pouch??? Mine is turning 6 on 10/13

Dr Shen has been my GI for 12 years and I have been through 2 jpouches due to leaks/ sinus', and fistulas and I never worked out or lifted weights. I also had a hernia repair. I always lived in fear of creating more issues my doing core exercises. Well now I am dealing with chronic lower back pain because my core is so weak and putting all the strain on my back. I started going to PT and started doing core strengthening like crunches and my back pain has greatly improved. I wont do heavy weights but I will for sure continue to do core exercises for my lower back..

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