Dietary Needs for JPouchers

My recent thread got me thinking about special dietary needs for those of us without a colon. I eat a chobani yogurt every am but probably don't drink enough fluids, etc. I take two Once A Day gummy vitamins too. Could anyone post info on what foods / liquids - and how much of each we need to intake daily to compensate for the loss of a colon?
 
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I honestly don't do anything without my colon that I did with my colon, in terms of diet. I have no other health issues, my annual blood work is fine, albeit a low Vitamin D which I do supplement. I eat a cup of plain yogurt every day but I have been doing that the majority of my life and long before I was diagnosed with UC. I eat fairly healthy, lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, limit bread, and eat lean protein when I do eat meat. I drink 20oz of coffee in the morning then nothing until I hit the gym. I can out drink anyone when I' exercising but find during the work day I get most of my fluid intake via food. Breakfast and lunch consist of lots of fresh fruit high in water content.

Since we are very individual I think the best place for you to start is with a thorough CBC to see if you do need supplementing with either B or D. I wouldn't just take something because I thought I needed it, but that's just me. Your fluid intake is also going to be highly individual, based on your body's needs.

Sue Big Grin

Sue Big Grin
 
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I second what Sue said, in the sense that our individual needs will vary. Keep in mind that over-supplementing can be just as dangerous as under-supplementing, especially if you start playing around with things like iron, potassium, etc. Worst case scenario with over-supplementation is that you can give yourself an overdose; least case is that you're paying money for stuff that is just running straight through your system. I do currently take several supplements (iron, multivit, vit D/calcium, B12 and omega-3s) but ALL of these have been recommended to me at some point or another either by my doctor or dietician. I admit that some days I probably don't drink as much fluid as I should, but I try to urination as a guide (not to be too graphic *LOL* but obviously if I am peeing too much or too little, I will adjust accordingly). My dietician did tell me that thirst is not really a good indicator for fluid intake, because usually you are already dehydrated by the time you feel thirsty. So something to consider.

But, apart from a multivit and calcium, which most of us should be taking anyway, bloodwork is definitely a good start to see what you might be deficient in. In general, studies have shown that IBD patients are often deficient in potassium, iron, B12, magnesium, and vit D, but it doesn't mean that all of us will be deficient or that we are deficient in all of those things simultaneously. And there can be other mineral deficiencies as well, not all of which are tested for on routine blood panels. That's why it's a good idea to talk to your doctor about what you may need or what you may not be fully absorbing and go from there.
 
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Most nutrients are absorbed in the small intestine, so the colon being gone shouldn't impact nutrition too horribly much. That being said, certain things are absorbed by the colon, such as vitamin B, sodium, and fluids. As the small intestinal tissue adapts to it's new role, it will probably start picking up the slack.

Of course, nutrition is a very individual thing. I'm sure there are plenty of people on these forums that, if they ate like I do, would be miserable. If you're worried that you're deficient in some key nutrient, I'd recommend getting a blood test just to be sure. The best advice I can give is to find whatever works for you and keep doing that.
 
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I don't do anything special either with the exception of a greek yogurt everyday like you do. I don't even drink that much and I have no issues with dehydration. I know you mentioned you put on some weight so maybe just try and cut your sugar intake and carb intake and I bet you will lose. Along with some exercise of course. I gained an extra 15 pounds back after my takedown and last summer I cut out all sugar (that's my weakness) and hit the treadmill and the 15 pounds came right off. I have been able to maintain it too and still have a treat for myself each day now.

There are definitely things that I'm not absorbing and iron is the main one for me. I am still anemic after all this time and the only thing that helps me are iron infusions. Oral iron hasn't helped. No dr. has been able to tell me why because they say all the nutrients are absorbed thru the small intestine which I know is true but I have no explanation to my iron issues.
 
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Until recently, I ate whatever I wanted and was fine. Recently, two decades in, I have to be a little more careful with nuts, seeds, high fiber, and certain raw foods. I think most people in general don't drink enough... I find I don't generally feel dehydrated as a J poucher, and I don't do anything majorly special, but if I get ill, esp. with a GI bug, I CAN dehydrate much faster than a normal person, and often need IV fluids in those moments. I've never been consistently dependent on supplements, preferring to get it from my food, but had to do some iron when a copper IUD gave me ridonkulously long periods.
 
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